A Cat-alogue of Bitzlers


In which I hope to post links and tidbits of cats and kings and other things.

Author Scott Lynch responds to a critic of the character Zamira Drakasha, a black woman pirate in his fantasy book Red Seas Under Red Skies, the second novel of the Gentleman Bastard series. →

fuckyeahscifiwomenofcolour:

The bolded sections represent quotes from the criticism he received. All the z-snaps are in order.

Your characters are unrealistic stereotpyes of political correctness. Is it really necessary for the sake of popular sensibilities to have in a fantasy what we have in the real world? I read…

Final thoughts on this whole kerfuffle. →

ohdeargodbees:

I’ve said my piece about my personal life and that holds true. I have zero interest in ever discussing my sex or love life publicly on other people’s terms. If you want answers about the particulars of a game developer’s private romantic entanglements, please ask yourself why you feel entitled…

hgprime:

fuckyeahjosswhedon:

Enver Gjokaj Cast In ABC Series ‘Marvel’s Agent Carter’



Yay!!!

hgprime:

fuckyeahjosswhedon:

Enver Gjokaj Cast In ABC Series ‘Marvel’s Agent Carter’

Yay!!!

Source: fuckyeahjosswhedon

http://cavalorn.tumblr.com/post/95632291940/i-can-see-you-all-your-different-faces-are →

cavalorn:

'I can see you. All your different faces are here.'

Clara is unique among companions in that she has met (and saved) every single incarnation of the Doctor, from Hartnell onwards. She, more than anyone, ought to know that he is the same man no matter what face he wears.

'I saw all of…

Source: cavalorn

Even though it might sound harsh and impolitic, here is the bottom line: if you don’t want to get shot, tased, pepper-sprayed, struck with a baton or thrown to the ground, just do what I tell you. Don’t argue with me, don’t call me names, don’t tell me that I can’t stop you, don’t say I’m a racist pig, don’t threaten that you’ll sue me and take away my badge. Don’t scream at me that you pay my salary, and don’t even think of aggressively walking towards me. Most field stops are complete in minutes. How difficult is it to cooperate for that long?

LAPD officer Sunil Dutta, writing 100% seriously in a WaPo op-ed entitled (I kid you not) “I’m a cop. If you don’t want to get hurt, don’t challenge me.” (via hipsterlibertarian)

The sense of entitled, sadistic, “moral disengagement” by the police is truly disheartening. How can they build trust in a community they are using for their role-playing FPS fantasies?

(via liberalsarecool)

I’m reading the article now and it’s frightening in its disconnect. We’re the good guys, “So know your place, don’t exercise rights you actually have and therefore I won’t be obliged to harm (and or kill) you.” 

What jars me about the stance is, if a person treated his neighbors or family this way without the backing of a badge, these same cops would be called within a instant because…he or she would have been using threats and force to bludgeon others into coercion.

This officer’s justification is more terrifying than fascinating because according to him, with great power comes the right to not have that power commented on, Or else. . 

(via invisiblelad)

This. This is the connection between Ferguson and Occupy.

The racial component of Mike Brown’s and so many other unarmed Americans’ deaths is very real, and I believe is the root cause of the aggressive treatment in the first place.

But this issue is a tremendous factor in its escalation, and why we see such incomprehension from authorities over citizens not obeying (even if they cannot respond), and why police overreact so violently.

Whether people are protesting for justice, arguing for Wall Street reform, or dancing on federal property, the idea that the police don’t have the legal authority to make us do whatever they feel like telling us to do appears to be something that has never occurred to the police themselves.

(via truthdogg)

Source: kohenari

archifist:

a-kind-of-library:

Look what I stumbled upon on my walk! A mini library. I’ve only ever seen pictures of these on Tumblr, so this just made my night.

not just ANY mini library! A TARDIS! doctorwho have you seen this yet? so fab.

Source: a-kind-of-library

putyouinabettermood:

Saint Bernard trying to get a kitten to play via http://ift.tt/1oYo2dq putyouinabettermood.com

putyouinabettermood:

Saint Bernard trying to get a kitten to play via http://ift.tt/1oYo2dq putyouinabettermood.com

archifist:

plannedparenthood:


TRUTH. Love this graphic from the Transcending Gender Project.


I still have to remind myself of this sometimes. I’ll be driving down the street and see someone and think is that a ‘guy or a girl?’ and then I’m like, wait, who cares? It’s not my business.

True.

archifist:

plannedparenthood:

TRUTH. Love this graphic from the Transcending Gender Project.

I still have to remind myself of this sometimes. I’ll be driving down the street and see someone and think is that a ‘guy or a girl?’ and then I’m like, wait, who cares? It’s not my business.

True.

Source: plannedparenthood

husbandsgifs:

Brad Bell, Sean Hemeon, Alessandra Torresani, Deborah Theaker, Beth Grant, and Michael Hogan — Husbands Season 3

Husbands - Meet the Parents

Watch Seasons 1 & 2  here — Season 3 at cwseed.com

International Fans watch Season 3 here

Source: n3v3r-mor3

husbandstheseriesfans:

By Lisa Granshaw on August 17, 2014

In 2011, a webseries called Husbands premiered on the scene, making a major impact on the landscape of independently made online programming. Following a gay couple as they deal with accidentally getting married and deciding to stay married so as not to hurt the marriage equality cause, the show addressed important cultural issues while never losing its humor. It received numerous awards and critical acclaim for how it cleverly added a twist to the newlywed sitcom format. Three years later, it’s still making people laugh and think as it moves from airing on platforms like YouTube to a major network’s digital studio. 
From the start, series creators, writers, and executive producers Jane Espenson and Brad Bell had confidence the show would be a success. Bell, who stars in the show as Cheeks and acts as showrunner, told the Daily Dot he was certain a Husbands audience was out there, and that audience is the entire reason they made the show.
“That audience started with Jane and me, really, because we made the show we wanted to see. And I just had this feeling, like when you see a midnight screening and think, ‘This is going to be huge,’” Bell said. “The world was more than ready. It’s as if they were already missing the show, before it was ever made.”
Espenson, a veteran TV writer known for her work on hit shows Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Once Upon a Time among others, agreed that the time was right for the series and said they totally imagined it could take off. 
“I remember saying, ‘If we don’t do this, in five years there will be a show on NBC called Husbands that will be this show, but I think we can do it better. Let’s get a jump on it because we’re five years ahead of the curve,’ and that was in 2011,” she said. “Here we are coming up and things happened faster than anybody anticipated. Instead of five years, it’s three years and we’ve grown and we’re a part of the CW family, and we’re gonna make more.”
Season 3 ended in October, and while they’ve produced no new content since then, Espenson feels the show has still been catching fire this year. This season was the first created in partnership with CW’s digital-only studio CW Seed. After their agent mentioned to the pair that CW was looking for a comedy, they set up a meeting and discovered the executives were already fans.


“They knew character names and had favorite lines. It was pretty surreal,” Bell said. “I went in thinking we were going to have about four and a half seconds to either capture their attention or flop, since that’s more the norm when you’re pitching. But instead, they knew the show, and they got the show. They were basically like, ‘We love what you do. Keep doing that. That’s your note.’ No part of the process was changed by working with them, which allowed us to be even more on top of our game creatively, because there wasn’t anyone standing over our shoulders.” 
Before moving to CW Seed, the show had turned to Kickstarter for help developing season 2. The experience was so positive Espenson said she’d use it again. One of the things she thought was great about the campaign was how easy it made it to find out who their fans are; it’s clear the audience they reach through the series is important to both creators. 
Male and female, gay and straight, and old and young alike seem able to relate to Husbands, and the fans tell the creators as much online and in-person at events such as San Diego Comic-Con. Espenson said they’ve even had couples come up to them and admit to being born-again Christians and loving the show, despite the apparent contradiction. When this happens, she sees directly affect her fellow creator.
“Something [Bell] strongly believes in is that there are bridges to be made, that people get so passionate about something they put up walls where they don’t have to be. You can find allies in unexpected places,” Espenson told the Daily Dot. “Just working with him and thinking with him about that has made me realize some of the things we do inadvertently, such as when we do put so much emphasis on ‘the women of sci-fi’ as opposed to just saying ‘the great minds of sci-fi and look how many of them are women,’ I think there’s a slightly different message there. I hope we don’t end up in a ‘women versus men’ or ‘gay versus straight’ or ‘Christian versus atheist’ situation all the time. It should be that everybody benefits.”
They hope to continue building these bridges with the series as they enter season 4, which is currently in the writing stage according to Espenson. It may have been a while since fans got their Husbands fix, but they have a lot to look forward to next season as the creators try to touch on a variety of storylines, from romantic to political to current events. Of course they’ll also always include the distinct voice of Bell’s character Cheeks and get back to the question of whether the love is enough to carry these two accidental newlyweds through it all.

While there have been calls for Husbands to finally make the transition to TV, for now it looks like anyone who wants to watch season 4 will have to keep their eyes on CW Seed. Still, there just might be a lot more on the horizon for fans to look forward to if Bell’s comments about season 4 are any indication:
“I can’t say much, which often gets me accused of being a tease. But seriously, I legally can’t say anything. In fact, I’ve already said too much! But I’ll say just this much more… There are still some details to figure out, but a full-scale invasion has always been on Husbands' big gay agenda,” he said. “I have a feeling that this time next year, we might just be inescapable.”


Screenshot via CW Seed/YouTube

husbandstheseriesfans:

By Lisa Granshaw on August 17, 2014

In 2011, a webseries called Husbands premiered on the scene, making a major impact on the landscape of independently made online programming. Following a gay couple as they deal with accidentally getting married and deciding to stay married so as not to hurt the marriage equality cause, the show addressed important cultural issues while never losing its humor. It received numerous awards and critical acclaim for how it cleverly added a twist to the newlywed sitcom format. Three years later, it’s still making people laugh and think as it moves from airing on platforms like YouTube to a major network’s digital studio. 

From the start, series creators, writers, and executive producers Jane Espenson and Brad Bell had confidence the show would be a success. Bell, who stars in the show as Cheeks and acts as showrunner, told the Daily Dot he was certain a Husbands audience was out there, and that audience is the entire reason they made the show.

“That audience started with Jane and me, really, because we made the show we wanted to see. And I just had this feeling, like when you see a midnight screening and think, ‘This is going to be huge,’” Bell said. “The world was more than ready. It’s as if they were already missing the show, before it was ever made.”

Espenson, a veteran TV writer known for her work on hit shows Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Once Upon a Time among others, agreed that the time was right for the series and said they totally imagined it could take off. 

“I remember saying, ‘If we don’t do this, in five years there will be a show on NBC called Husbands that will be this show, but I think we can do it better. Let’s get a jump on it because we’re five years ahead of the curve,’ and that was in 2011,” she said. “Here we are coming up and things happened faster than anybody anticipated. Instead of five years, it’s three years and we’ve grown and we’re a part of the CW family, and we’re gonna make more.”

Season 3 ended in October, and while they’ve produced no new content since then, Espenson feels the show has still been catching fire this year. This season was the first created in partnership with CW’s digital-only studio CW Seed. After their agent mentioned to the pair that CW was looking for a comedy, they set up a meeting and discovered the executives were already fans.

image

image

“They knew character names and had favorite lines. It was pretty surreal,” Bell said. “I went in thinking we were going to have about four and a half seconds to either capture their attention or flop, since that’s more the norm when you’re pitching. But instead, they knew the show, and they got the show. They were basically like, ‘We love what you do. Keep doing that. That’s your note.’ No part of the process was changed by working with them, which allowed us to be even more on top of our game creatively, because there wasn’t anyone standing over our shoulders.” 

Before moving to CW Seed, the show had turned to Kickstarter for help developing season 2. The experience was so positive Espenson said she’d use it again. One of the things she thought was great about the campaign was how easy it made it to find out who their fans are; it’s clear the audience they reach through the series is important to both creators. 

Male and female, gay and straight, and old and young alike seem able to relate to Husbands, and the fans tell the creators as much online and in-person at events such as San Diego Comic-Con. Espenson said they’ve even had couples come up to them and admit to being born-again Christians and loving the show, despite the apparent contradiction. When this happens, she sees directly affect her fellow creator.

“Something [Bell] strongly believes in is that there are bridges to be made, that people get so passionate about something they put up walls where they don’t have to be. You can find allies in unexpected places,” Espenson told the Daily Dot. “Just working with him and thinking with him about that has made me realize some of the things we do inadvertently, such as when we do put so much emphasis on ‘the women of sci-fi’ as opposed to just saying ‘the great minds of sci-fi and look how many of them are women,’ I think there’s a slightly different message there. I hope we don’t end up in a ‘women versus men’ or ‘gay versus straight’ or ‘Christian versus atheist’ situation all the time. It should be that everybody benefits.”

They hope to continue building these bridges with the series as they enter season 4, which is currently in the writing stage according to Espenson. It may have been a while since fans got their Husbands fix, but they have a lot to look forward to next season as the creators try to touch on a variety of storylines, from romantic to political to current events. Of course they’ll also always include the distinct voice of Bell’s character Cheeks and get back to the question of whether the love is enough to carry these two accidental newlyweds through it all.

image

While there have been calls for Husbands to finally make the transition to TV, for now it looks like anyone who wants to watch season 4 will have to keep their eyes on CW Seed. Still, there just might be a lot more on the horizon for fans to look forward to if Bell’s comments about season 4 are any indication:

“I can’t say much, which often gets me accused of being a tease. But seriously, I legally can’t say anything. In fact, I’ve already said too much! But I’ll say just this much more… There are still some details to figure out, but a full-scale invasion has always been on Husbands' big gay agenda,” he said. “I have a feeling that this time next year, we might just be inescapable.”

Screenshot via CW Seed/YouTube